Category Archives: SA

ASSA lecture by Prof. Lisa Kewley

The Astronomical Society of South Australia has invited AIP members to a special General Meeting:

The Astronomical Society of South Australia is hosting a special General Meeting starting at 8pm Wednesday 3rd of March 2021 featuring an in-person presentation by Prof. Lisa Kewley discussing galaxy formation research as well as equity & diversity initiatives. The ASSA will also be launching a new initiative to engage more women into the science of Astronomy through our Society.

Eventbrite registration for free tickets:
https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/public-lecture-astro-3d-by-prof-lisa-kewley-tickets-141081451419

Facebook Page:
https://www.facebook.com/events/488225119218624/

Additional info:
https://www.assa.org.au/events/meetings/general-meeting-march-2021/

Bronze Bragg Presentation and Free Public Lecture

6:30 pm, Tuesday February 16th 2021
The Braggs lecture theatre, Braggs building,
University of Adelaide (North Terrace campus)

“Penrose, Singularities and Black Holes: The Nobel Prize in Physics 2020”

Professor Susan Scott
Australian National University

Professor Susan Scott

Abstract:

In this talk we explore the 20th century story of black holes. Originally black holes were thought to be an undesirable artefact of Einstein’s general theory of relativity, but Penrose’s powerful singularity theorem of the 1960s turned that way of thinking on its head. As a result, we now believe our Universe to be full of black holes. As one of the greatest achievements in theoretical physics, Penrose’s breakthrough led to his receipt of the Nobel Prize in Physics for 2020. We will see how this Nobel Prize intimately connects with the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics for the first direct detection of gravitational waves

The Bronze Bragg medals and merit certificates will be presented at the lecture.

The medals are awarded for highest achievement in Physics in 2020 in the SACE Stage 2 assessments and IB Higher Level Physics, with certificates being for students who achieved a merit or a grade of 7.

Due to COVID-19 restrictions, seats are limited and bookings are essential through the Eventbrite link:
https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/bronze-bragg-presentation-and-free-public-lecture-2021-tickets-139837522795

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING AND DINNER

To be held on Wednesday 2nd December in the Public Schools Club, 207 East Terrace,  Adelaide

  • 6:00 pm Pre-meeting drinks
  • 6:30 pm Annual General Meeting
  • 7:30 pm Annual Dinner

Menu: 3 courses, alternate drop of one of each. (See menu below).

We need to give seven days’ notice for vegans, vegetarians and or any other dietary  considerations (lactose free, peanut allergy, gluten-free).

Bookings are essential and should be made with Dr Laurence Stamatescu by Wednesday  25th November, by email to lstamatescu@gmail.com

The cost of the 3-course dinner (to be paid on the night) is:

  • AIP members and guests: $59 per person
  • AIP student members: $30 per person

The mid-dinner speaker will be Dr Bruce Ward (retired, DSTgroup).

MENU 

SANDFORD HOUSE DINING  

ENTREÉ 

  • Pan Fried Halloumi 
  • Grilled Portobello Mushrooms  

MAIN  

  • Salmon Fillet – Crispy Vegetables – Citrus & Dill Sauce 
  • Sirloin Char Grilled – Mash Potato – Greens – Red Wine Jus 

DESSERT 

  • Vanilla Panna Cotta – Mixed Berry Compote 
  • Braggs Mess

Meet an astronaut

Dr Epps video recording for the Claire Corani Memorial Lecture:

https://video.flinders.edu.au/events20/20/MeetAnAstronaut.cfm

Dr Jeanette Epps
Obtained a bachelor’s degree in physics in 1992 from LeMoyne College in her hometown of Syracuse, New York. She completed a master’s degree in science in 1994 and a doctorate in aerospace engineering in 2000, both from the University of Maryland, College Park.
While earning her doctorate, Epps was a NASA Graduate Student Researchers Project fellow, authoring several journal and conference articles on her research. After completing graduate school, she worked in a research laboratory for more than two years, co-authoring several patents, before the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) recruited her. She spent seven years as a CIA technical intelligence officer before her selection as a member of the 2009 astronaut class.

NASA Experience:
Dr. Epps was selected in July 2009 as one of 9 members of the 20th NASA astronaut class. Her Astronaut Candidate Training included Russian Language training, spacewalk training (EVA), robotics, T‐38 jet training, geology and National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) training. After graduating Dr. Epps continued training by participating in NEEMO (NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operation), geologic studies in Hawaii, and language immersion in Moscow as well as continued training in EVA, robotics and T‐38.

NASA has assigned astronaut Jeanette Epps to NASA’s Boeing Starliner-1 mission, the first operational crewed flight of Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft on a mission to the International Space Station.

Epps will join NASA astronauts Sunita Williams and Josh Cassada for a six-month expedition planned for a launch in 2021 to the orbiting space laboratory. The flight will follow NASA certification after a successful uncrewed Orbital Flight Test-2 and Crew Flight Test with astronauts.

Questions

  • How did you go from being a CIA agent to an Astronaut?
  • Do you think Space Tourism will be possible?
  • Do you think the Artemis program will fulfil its goal of sending humans back to the Moon by 2024?
  • I would like to know about the rigour and nature of the preparations for the travel to the moon in 2024 and the aims and expected duration of the mission; what is her current involvement in this?
  • Do you think feasible beyond the moon travel, will the SpaceX Mars program fulfill its goal of a manned flight to Mars in 2024?
  • Did she have an inspiration or a role model that she looked up to become an astronaut?
  • How on earth do you go from CIA to Astronaut?
  • What has been your biggest challenge in as an astronaut?
  • Are there any specific challenges for females in the industry that you work in?
  • Hypothetical: if you had contact with an off world species, is there a protocol for that and what is it… or is that not something that is considered. 
  • What is the likelihood of being hit by a small piece of space debris on a space walk?
  • Besides during your T-38 training, how often do you get to fly in the T-38?
  • What physical/survival training is required to be an astronaut?

The Claire Corani Memorial Lecture

by Dr Jeanette J. Epps, NASA Astronaut

at 9:00am–10:00am on Friday 28th August 2020

in the South 1 Lecture Theatre
off Anchor Court, South Ridge (near car parks 7, 8 and 9)
Flinders University

Biography: Jeanette J. Epps (Ph.D.) was selected as an astronaut in 2009.  She completed astronaut candidate training which included scientific and technical briefings, intensive instruction in International Space Station systems, spacewalk training, robotics, T-38 flight training and wilderness survival training.  The New York native was a NASA Fellow during graduate school and authored several journal and conference articles.  Dr. Epps worked for Ford Motor Company where she received both a provisional patent and a U.S. patent.  After leaving Ford, she joined the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) as a Technical Intelligence Officer before becoming an astronaut.

NASA Experience: Dr. Epps was selected in July 2009 as one of 9 members of the 20th NASA astronaut class. Her Astronaut Candidate Training included Russian Language training, spacewalk training (EVA), robotics, T-38 jet training, geology and National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS) training. After graduating Dr. Epps continued training by participating in NEEMO (NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operation), geologic studies in Hawaii, and language immersion in Moscow as well as continued training in EVA, robotics and T-38. Dr. Epps served as a representative to the Generic Joint Operation Panel working on crew efficiency on the space station as well as other topics, served as a Crew Support Astronaut for two expeditions, and served as lead CAPCOM in mission control.

The Claire Corani Memorial prizes, available for award to the top second-year female Physics student at each AIP-accredited SA university in 2019, will be presented at the lecture.

Due to Covid-19 restrictions, if you plan attending in person please register with the AIP secretary: aip_branchsecretary_sa@physics.org.au

Bronze Bragg Presentation and Free Public Lecture

6:30 pm, Thursday February 20th 2020

 The Braggs lecture theatre in the Braggs building

University of Adelaide (North Terrace campus)

On the 2019 Nobel Prize

“A short history of the universe – as we understand it today”

Prof. Rachel Webster

University of Melbourne

Abstract:

Most of the universe is made of Hydrogen; indeed, in the early universe, there were essentially no elements heavier than Hydrogen and Helium. During this talk Professor Webster will trace the history of the universe, using Hydrogen as the primary focus. She will explain the bits we understand and some of the key questions we are addressing today.  The efforts of Australian astronomers will be highlighted, as well as some of the new telescopes that will be operating in the next few years. 

The Bronze Bragg medals and merit certificates will be presented at the lecture.

The medals are awarded for highest achievement in Physics in 2019 in the SACE Stage 2 assessments and IB Higher Level Physics, with certificates being for students who achieved a merit or a grade of 7.


A space Adventure

at 6.30pm on Wednesday 9th Oct 2019

The Braggs Lecture Theatre,
The University of Adelaide, North Terrace

Abstract: Selected as an astronaut candidate by NASA in April 1996, Daniel Tani went on to spend 120 days living and working aboard the International Space Station. During his tour of duty aboard the station, he performed numerous robotic operations and logged a total of 34 hours and 59 minutes during five spacewalks. Come and hear about his amazing space adventure and what it is like to live and work in space.

Bio: Daniel Tani received his Bachelors and Master of Science degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1984 and 1988, respectively, in addition to an Honorary Doctorate of Science from Elmhurst College (IL) 2003. Dr Tani worked at Hughes Aircraft Corporation, as a Design Engineer in the Space and Communications group, in the Experimental Psychology department of Bolt Beranek and Newman, and in 1988, he went on to join the Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC), initially as a Senior Structures Engineer and then as the Mission Operations Manager for the Transfer Orbit Stage (TOS). In that role, he served as the TOS Flight Operations lead, working with NASA/JSC Mission Control in support of the deployment of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)/TOS payload during the STS-51 mission in Sep 1993. Dr Tani then moved to the Pegasus program at OSC as the Launch Operations Manager. He held technical duties in the Astronaut Office Computer Support Branch, and EVA Branch and served as a Crew Support Astronaut (CSA) for Expedition 4. In 2002, he was a crew member on the Aquarius undersea research habitat for nine days as part of the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO)-2 mission. Dr Tani then trained and qualified as the backup Flight Engineer for Expedition 11. After his flight on Expedition 16, Dr Tani served as Branch Chief of the International Space Station branch. He also served as a Capsule Communicator (CAPCOM) for the International Space Station and was the lead CAPCOM for Expedition 26. Tani left NASA in August 2012 to become the Vice President of Mission and Cargo Operations in the Advanced Programs Group of Orbital Sciences Corporation.

SPACEFLIGHT EXPERIENCE: Dr Tani served as Mission Specialist 2 on STS-108 Endeavour. On his second spaceflight, Dr Tani served as Expedition-16 Flight Engineer and spent 120 days living and working aboard the International Space Station. He launched to the Station aboard STS-120 and returned aboard STS-122.

Free – visitors welcome – booking not required

How neutrons will save the world

The Claire Corani Memorial Lecture

The South Australian lecture in the

2019 AIP Women in Physics Lecture Tour

at 6:30pm–7:45pm on Tuesday 20th August 2019

in the Napier 102 Lecture Theatre
Napier Building, the University of Adelaide, North Terrace campus.

Abstract: They are small, neutral and often in a spin, and so much more than ‘just’ part of the atom. Neutrons are the sub-atomic particles that are here to save the world. This trusty particle can be called on to discover the details that no other can fathom. From the shape of a virus and how a drug can disable it, to keeping electrons flowing in the next generation of batteries. Neutrons truly are today’s super particle

Biography: Dr Helen Maynard-Casely is an Instrument Scientist based at ANSTO (the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation) where she uses neutrons to investigate the materials that make up our solar system. She has a PhD in high-pressure physics from the University of Edinburgh and has been lucky enough to have collected data in facilities all over the world.

The Claire Corani Memorial prizes, available for award to the top second-year female Physics student at each SA university in 2018, will be presented at the lecture.

Mid-Year Dinner

Date And Time
Thu, July 18, 2019
6:30 PM – 10:00 PM

The SA Branch of the Australian Institute of Physics will be holding its mid-year dinner and awards night in Kipling’s Restaurant at the Bombay Bicycle Club on Thursday 18th July. Come along for an informal evening with your fellow physicist including students, academics and researchers. Drinks will be from 6.30 pm with the dinner commencing at 7.00 pm.

We will be presenting the Silver Bragg Awards to the top final year students who have completed a Bachelor of Science degree in 2018 with a major in Physics from the University of Adelaide and Flinders University. The 2019 SA Physics Teacher of the Year award will also be acknowledged.

Location
Bombay Bicycle Club
29 Torrens RoadOvingham, SA 5082

Cost: A La Carte (Kipling’s Restaurant Menu
http://www.bombaybicycleclub.com.au/assets/images/uploads/files/pdf/kiplings-jan-2018.pdf) – Pay on the night (no separate bills so paying by cash will be greatly appreciated)

The Evolutionary Map of the Universe

Wednesday 3rd of April 2019 at 8pm
Kerr Grant Lecture Theatre
2nd Floor, Physics Building
The University of Adelaide
North Terrace, Adelaide

The Evolutionary Map of the Universe

Professor Ray Norris
CSIRO Astronomy & Space Science &
Western Sydney University

Abstract: The m Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope is nearing completion in Western Australia. One of the key projects driving it is EMU – the Evolutionary Map of the Universe – which has an ambitious goal of studying the sky at radio wavelengths in unprecedented detail, boldly going where no telescope has gone before. Our scientific goal is to figure out how galaxies evolved in the early days of the Universe and how they evolve to the Universe we see today, with stars, planets, rocks, trees, and astronomers. What will we find? How will it change our view of how we got to be here? What is the role of black holes in regulating the growth of galaxies? And given that the most spectacular discoveries in astronomy are unexpected, we will be watching especially carefully for serendipitous discoveries that pop up in the data.

Bio: Professor Ray Norris is a British/Australian astronomer with CSIRO Astronomy & Space Science and Western Sydney University, who researches how galaxies formed and evolved after the Big Bang, and also researches the astronomy of  Aboriginal Australians. He frequently appears on radio and TV, featured in the stage show “The First Astronomers” with Wardaman elder Bill Yidumduma Harney, and has written the novel “Graven Images”.  He was educated at Cambridge University, and University of Manchester, UK, and moved to Australia to join CSIRO, where he became Head of Astrophysics in 1994, and then Deputy Director of the Australia Telescope, and Director of the Australian Astronomy Major National Research Facility, before returning in 2005 to active research. He currently leads an international project (EMU, or Evolutionary Map of the Universe) to understand the origin and evolution of galaxies, using the new Australian SKA Pathfinder radio-telescope nearing completion in Western Australia, and is also pioneering the WTF project to discover the unexpected in astronomical data.

Free – visitors welcome –  booking not required (*Please note – university security locks entrance doors at 8pm sharp*)